GETTING RID OF THE WINTER BLUES

Surviving the winter in Gothenburg is not always an easy task, especially during those long months! Many of us internationals from the tropics experience a huge weather/climate shock when moving to Sweden. To our utter dismay it can be difficult to adapt not only to the harsh coldness, rain, and strong powerful winds, but also those long dark days when the sun sets around 2 P.M. As an extremely active person who absolutely loves the sun, warmth, nature, and being outside; my first year in Sweden was one of the most difficult years I had ever experienced. Having moved half way across the world from Los Angeles, California during the summer, I didn´t take full advantage of those long hot summer days – the first year around, thinking that most days would be similar throughout the year. How gullible was I? I was definitely in for a huge awakening!

Those dark cold Swedish days crept up like a shadow when the sun starts to set. I just couldn´t believe it! Walking home on occasion I literally felt my bones shiver, the rain hit me from all angles, and those horrible gusts of wind would be so strong that even my umbrella would turn inside out! This was not so cool to me – and I did not want to accept this as my reality. I was used to wearing flip-flops and my bikini underneath a plaid button down Abercrombie t-shirt not thinking twice about any kind of rain or cold weather. Now I was stuck with layers of long johns underneath my clothes and having to wear penguin looking winter coats – I did not feel stylish and wasn´t happy looking like a fat penguin. I would attempt to go shopping around noon and then it would get so dark unexpectedly, that I would not be able to find my way home! Walking around the city, with all the streets iced over I would watch the Swedes slip and slide dropping their groceries and bags attempting to walk back to their homes. Was this my reality? I felt as if I was in Siberia!

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On the Rocks: Exploring Styrsö

Brace yourselves, summer is coming. The days are getting longer (especially here in northern Europe), the weather’s getting warmer and the schools are ending their year. While residents of Gothenburg are known to love spending their afternoons on terraces when it’s even remotely sunny, there’s one place which is favoured above all others when people want to enjoy a nice summer day. Although it takes some effort to reach, the archipelago just off the coast provides a haven of relaxation and nature, with the island Styrsö being the prime example.

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From this Generation to the Next: Tips for Your Stay in Gothenburg

Knowing that I’ll be leaving this city in two months fills my heart with sorrow. It seems only yesterday that I first arrived, dragging two big suitcases around the city with me. Most of my friends will leave at the end of the month, and as I try to make the best out of my remaining days here, I know that Gothenburg will forever have a place in my heart. So here are some tips for the following generation that I’d like to share, acquired over my four month stay in Gothenburg.

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Setting Sail and Watching Fish

Let’s face it: Gothenburg is great as a coastal city, but things can be a bit rainy at times. So where do you go when you want to enjoy the water, but without getting actually wet? The Sjöfartsmuseet (maritime museum), with its historical artefacts and beautiful aquarium, is a great place to visit on a not-so-sunny day.

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10 Places You Should not Miss in and around Haga

I’m sure all of us are familiar with Haga. When we google Gothenburg, Haga would definitely be in the top hits of our search results. I’ve been to Haga a few times myself, and that should be enough… or so you’d think. Yes, we’ve walked on the rustic cobblestones, we’ve soaked in the atmosphere, and we’ve seen and tried the lovely cafes along this stretch. Some might feel that Haga is more of a tourist place, but I beseech you to give it one more chance, because you may have looked, but have you seen? This is my list of interesting places near and around Haga.

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Valborg: Enjoying the Wickedly Chalmers Cortège

One of the nicest things about studying abroad is learning something about local traditions. One of these is Valborg (Walpurgis). Despite being named after Walpurga, a Christian saint, this Swedish celebration isn’t very religious in nature. Instead, the Swedes use this opportunity to celebrate the arrival of spring, with various cities hosting various events.

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Snippets of Welcoming Spring

As spring started to dawn upon us, a group of us decided to make use of the barbeque pits in Olofshöjd. It was an impromptu meet up amongst friends who have travelled and been away from each other for weeks. It was an opportunity to make use of the good weather, as well as to catch up and hear about each other’s adventures.

Being away from Sweden for a while now, I’ve started to see signs of spring. The lush green grass with the inviting sun; longer daylights; people laying out their picnic mats on random grass fields and just lying on them – sunbathing, eating, talking and reading.

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